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Old 17th September 2023, 04:02 PM   #1
castellum aquilonis
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Default European Blade Colonial Mexican Generals Sword

I would like to get a few opinions about this sword.
I assume it is 19th century with an earlier blade.
The grip is silver inlayed.
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Last edited by Lee; 17th September 2023 at 05:13 PM.
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Old 17th September 2023, 09:22 PM   #2
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Most intriguing Mexican sword, post independence from Spain in 1821 and as noted probably mid 19th c. The eagle head was a most important symbol in Mexican history and heraldry and these became extremely popular on edged weapons in that period. It seems most of the arms were produced in regions in Oaxaca and Guerrero, from those times well into 20th c.

The blade with 'Spanish motto' does appear to be of the numbers of these which came into the Spanish colonial sphere from late 18th c. into early 19th, this one seems to be one of the later ones which are believed to have been produced in Toledo. The style of the lettering seems to correspond to those.
Typically these blades were mounted in three bar cavalry hilts, as illustrated in the cavalry saber c.1820s.

The curious shape of the quillons and some of the overall gestalt is tempting to bring in the possibility of Masonic associations, which did exist in Mexico and were often involved in the volatile and complex politics there.
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Old 19th September 2023, 12:34 AM   #3
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Just thought I'd add for interest,
This eagle head knife is probably 20th c. but from Guerrero, noting the popularity of the eagle head in these Mexican regions including Oaxaca.
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Old 19th September 2023, 05:58 PM   #4
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The blade seems similar to those of the Solingen retailer Hallbach. Towards 1775.
Not just for colonial swords but for army officers, including 1728 cavalry model.
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Old 20th September 2023, 08:27 PM   #5
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Default Espada Ancha

http://www.sonsofdewittcolony.org/ad...0kVAsxlBFrw44Y
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Old 22nd September 2023, 04:04 PM   #6
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As noted in this valuable link to the 'Dewitt' source regarding the well known Spanish colonial short swords known as 'espada ancha' in modern terms, often the full size Spanish blades were used in them. Typically they were reduced in length in these cases, however the heavier blacksmith made blades were usually preferred for the rugged use expected of them in the frontiers. The 'espada ancha' shown is an example of the use of one of the 'dragoon blades' from the 1728 cavalry sword context, this one of the form but without the familiar 'Spanish motto' (draw me not without reason.....), and perhaps earlier in the 18th century in similar Solingen contexts. It is an example from New Mexico context, but examples of this type are possibly from Sinaloa regions late 18thc. They are known in use in Alta California as late as 1831 (Avila, Cahuenga Pass).

The 'Spanish motto' blades appear to have been retailed in Solingen by Peter Knecht, as one source, per Sir James Mann (Wallace Collection, 1962, p.268).
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Old 22nd September 2023, 05:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midelburgo View Post
The blade seems similar to those of the Solingen retailer Hallbach. Towards 1775.
Not just for colonial swords but for army officers, including 1728 cavalry model.
I am not familiar with this retailer, Hallbach (from Bezdek?) but this blade seems to be quite possibly from those produced at the Royal Sword Factory at Toledo after Charles III sought to reinstitute production there in 1761. It took some time of course but in my thinking this may be the type of blade produced in latter 18th c there for cavalry swords and using the traditional inscription and in the vintage majescule style.
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Old 27th September 2023, 09:47 AM   #8
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Is the blade Solingen and not Toledo ?
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