Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 3rd April 2015, 07:19 PM   #1
Marcus
Member
 
Marcus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 420
Default Help placing kampilan please

I have been going through some of the nearly 300 threads that were a hit with the search term kampilan. The mind boggles. What a diversity of pieces and discussion of subtle features. I posted one picture of mine when I introduced the topic of betel nuts. Here are some more. I would appreciate comments of the when and where of this sword. My guess is that the hair is horse.
Thanks,
Marcus
Attached Images
      
Marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3rd April 2015, 09:10 PM   #2
CharlesS
Member
 
CharlesS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Greenville, NC
Posts: 1,780
Default

To my eye the kampie looks Moro through and through. The wood, the hilt style and carving are Moro. The laminated blade(very nice, btw!!) is a typical, but rarer, Moro form for these. The hair plum is intact and looks original.

It is a little hard to tell if the carving is just a little raw or if that is residue and dirt built up over years, with perhaps some tiny chips.

Seems to me you a have a very fine example of a late 19th-very early 20th century Moro kampillan in superb condition!

Great get!
CharlesS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th April 2015, 01:53 AM   #3
VANDOO
(deceased)
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OKLAHOMA, USA
Posts: 3,138
Thumbs up

I AGREE WITH CHARLES ON THE KAMPILIAN IT MAY BE A LITTLER OLDER BUT I SEE NOTHING TO INDICATE IT BEING FROM ANY OTHER SOURCE THAN MORO, MINDANO OF THERE ABOUTS. THE PATINA LOOKS GOOD EVEN THE CORD GUARD IS INTACT AND OLD. THE CORD WRAP ON THE GRIP MAY HAVE BEEN REPLACED BUT IS NOT A NEW REPLACEMENT THAT GOES FOR THE HORSE HAIR AS WELL BUT FROM PICTURES ITS NOT POSSIBLE TO TELL. THE BLADE IS WHAT WE USED TO REFER TO AS A WATERED STEEL BLADE (THE FOLDING TECKNIQUE SHOWS BUT A PATTERN NOT INTENTIONALLY MADE). A VERY NICE EXAMPLE OF BLADE AND THE CARVING ON THE HANDLE IS BETTER THAN AVERAGE EVEN IF THERE IS A LITTLE DAMMAGE. THE EYE IS ESPECIALLY NICELY DONE AND THERE IS A LOT OF PIERCING. A GOOD OLD EXAMPLE INTACT AND COMPLETE FROM THE PERIOD, I SEE NOTHING POINTEING TO RECENT RESTORATION PERHAPS A ETCH OR CLEANING OF THE OLD BLADE?
VANDOO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th April 2015, 12:23 PM   #4
CharlesS
Member
 
CharlesS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Greenville, NC
Posts: 1,780
Default

The pattern in this blade is already so clear you may not even need an etch. You could take a good oil like WD40 and a fine grade piece of steel wool and go over the blade well. This will remove any superficial rust and gunk on the blade and make the pattern even clearer. Once you have done this make sure all the oil residue is off and you may then want to use a VERY thin layer of a heavier oil to protect the blade. If you want to remove the dark spots and pitting, then I would take Barry's suggestion of a polish or etch.
CharlesS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th April 2015, 02:25 PM   #5
Marcus
Member
 
Marcus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 420
Default Tribal traditions amongst the Islamic Moro

The Kampilan came from Oriental Arms. It was in Artzi’s private collection for a number of years. He bought it in Manila in the late 70's. His attribution was to “the Sea Dayaks of Borneo (or) Moros of the Southern Philippines”. Based on the comments of Charles and Vandoo, it would seem more likely the latter than the former.
It is my understanding that the Moro were converted to Islam in the 15th century, so it seems a bit curious to me that so many of the stylistic features of this sword, produced hundreds of years later, are shared with swords of the animistic tribes such as the Dayaks. The is still a lot of tribal symbolism in this sword.
Marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th April 2015, 02:10 AM   #6
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 6,726
Default

There is also a Suluwesi form of kampilan. Where ever the Moros landed, influence can be had, including Borneo (where Moros also live) and Suluwesi (with whom the Moros traded).
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th April 2015, 06:33 AM   #7
Gavin Nugent
Member
 
Gavin Nugent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,464
Default

I never considered horse hair a typical attribute for these swords, replaced perhaps?

Gavin
Gavin Nugent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th April 2015, 03:48 PM   #8
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: The Aussie Bush
Posts: 3,184
Default

Looks like a typical Moro kampilan, most likely from the Lake Lanao area (i.e., Maranao) based on the particular hilt style--a very similar example can be found on a royal Maranao kampilan in the Museum of the Philippines, Manila, and the same hilt style is still being produced on Maranao pieces. Horse hair was the usual adornment on the hilt of a Moro kampilan.

Ian.
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5th April 2015, 04:07 PM   #9
Marcus
Member
 
Marcus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 420
Default Horse hair

Thanks Ian. That was my understanding.
Marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.