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Old 19th September 2021, 12:41 PM   #1
Bade
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Default East India Company Cavalry pistol

Hi all, I've acquired an 1808 dated United East India Company flintlock cavalry pistol, and would welcome any help in 'decoding' the various marks it carries. Some supporting pictures have been uploaded.

I think I've identified some (please advise if I've misread these):
The lock plate has the UEIC Rampant Lion crest, and 1808 shipping season date. There's also a 'crown over 2' inspection mark.
On the right wrist there's a very feint UEIC stock mark.

The left stock bears a partial makers name 'S.GA...' - could this be S.Galton of Birmingham? There's also the initials 'T.A'

The top of the breech has what looks like a 'crown over V', 'crown over 3', and a 'crown over 9' - not sure whether these give any insight.

My main interest is in finding out as much as possible about the likely history of this weapon - did it see use during the Napoleonic Wars?, did it go to India?, was it sold to the British Board of Ordnance? (I can't find a 'BO' mark or broad arrow). Any insights or opinions would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 19th September 2021, 02:54 PM   #2
corrado26
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I think you have a British Light Dragoon pistolmade for the East India Company, certainly not used in Europe during the Napoleonic Wars. It has been made and proofed in England but was delivered to India after 1808. The feint heart shaped UEIC stock mark on the right wrist is the store keepers mark of the UEIC. The "2" under crown at the lock plate was struck by a controler as was the "9" under crown on the barrel.
I show you a New Land Pattern pistol of the BEIC of my collection with similar marks.
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Old 19th September 2021, 10:17 PM   #3
adrian
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Hi Bade, in the detailed discourse about this same pistol on British Militaria Forum you noted that "Thanks for all the support and further information. In the right light, I can definitely see the EIC heart, plus the 'BO' letters".

If the Board of Ordnance stamp is present, as you said there, then it is evident that this example would be one of the thousands of EICo pistols purchased from that Company by the BO. That stamp is obviously an important part of any discussion, can you please verify whether you can see that stamp, or not?
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Old 22nd September 2021, 08:26 PM   #4
Richard G
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Adrian and Corrado are correct. The barrel bears the proof marks of the London Gunmakers Company and two inspector's marks, which is correct for EIC pistols. Not sure what the fifth one is.
Harding says large numbers of these were bought from the EIC by the Board of Ordnance and in the 1960's the Tower were selling them off; with the ironwork having been painted, or lacquered, black as a protective measure.
In 1811 or thereabouts the Board of Ordnance started producing their own version of this pistol. Geoff Davies etc, think the original EIC pistols may have been kept in reserve to issue to allies, or other non regular British army troops that might have been drafted in to serve the Crown.
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