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Old 22nd December 2021, 02:16 AM   #1
shayde78
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Default Ancient example of "Turks Head" wire work

I was hoping to get some opinions - the bottle pictured below was discovered in a field in 2014 in Western Scotland. It is believed to have been buried in 900CE, but to be from around 300CE, likely being of Roman origin. I was reading a post that speculated that the wire-work design that is called "Turks Head" (due to a passing similarity to a wrapped turban) wouldn't have appeared in Europe until after wars with the Turks. I offer this bottle as evidence that the design motif is much much older.

I welcome your thoughts regarding if the example pictured below actually is similar enough to the Turks Heads we see on hilts if weapons to support a tradition with ancient roots.
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Old 22nd December 2021, 02:26 AM   #2
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I forgot to link to the article: https://www.theguardian.com/science/...galloway-hoard
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Old 13th January 2022, 04:36 PM   #3
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I suspect the name came later, though I don't know what the wire knots on sword hilts were called in say the C17th.
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