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Old 12th September 2022, 08:54 PM   #31
Battara
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As requested a while back, here are closeups of the blade on my kris:
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Old 13th September 2022, 10:34 PM   #32
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XasteriX
There is flaws on yours that would indicate a laminated structure.

Battara
Honestly, can't tell for yours !
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Old 13th September 2022, 10:56 PM   #33
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This is the same result that came up when you etched one of my krises, Jose.
Mystifying....
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Old 13th September 2022, 11:03 PM   #34
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They probably are forge folded. Maybe the steel was well refined and almost homogeneous. Or, there is no carbon difference in the initial steel so, it is hard to discriminate the layer. In those cases, best is to search for flaws or bad welding.
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Old 14th September 2022, 12:08 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBG163 View Post
XasteriX
There is flaws on yours that would indicate a laminated structure.

Battara
Honestly, can't tell for yours !
Thanks very much for the assessment! Now I know.
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Old 14th September 2022, 03:25 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBG163 View Post
They probably are forge folded. Maybe the steel was well refined and almost homogeneous. Or, there is no carbon difference in the initial steel so, it is hard to discriminate the layer. In those cases, best is to search for flaws or bad welding.
That is a very good point, and so only the heat tempering would show then.
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Old 17th September 2022, 06:04 AM   #37
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BTW- for whoever is interested in the internal structure of the hilt- part of the horn hilt had a wide crack, so I decided to open it up and secure the surface gap with no-sag epoxy (I don't want tu fill up the whole interior because that would significantly alter the wield).

It's difficult to take pics, but this is the most decent close up I can get. It seems that the tang was extended by welding a portion of a small honing rod (or sharpening steel) and ran all the way to the peen bolt. The inside of the hilt had small bits of wood used as lightweight fillers.

I find this interesting because I felt that the retrofitter had to make do with whatever materials were immediately available. It's a testament to the ingenuity of artisans in a previous era.
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