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Old 15th October 2018, 10:45 PM   #31
dana_w
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Thanks Jim!
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Old 16th October 2018, 10:46 AM   #32
midelburgo
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The third sword in the opening post is known in Mexico as a "Chinaco" sword. Chinacos were the revolutionary guerrillas against the Maximilian empire in the 1860s. Later they evolved with refined hilts including silver and gold inlaids and Toledo blades from the 1870s and 1880s as the weapons of Guerrilla commanders up to the times of Pancho Villa. You can see one of these with a discussion (in Spanish) here:
https://www.mexicoarmado.com/cuchill...la-hoja-2.html

The first sword, with the ring, has similar examples in Philipines, with hilts made of horn. One has to remember that under Spanish dominion, Philipines depended administratively from Mexico, and the main trade and contact route was through the Acapulco-Manila galleon. I am not sure if the prototypes originated on one side or the other, but I think Philipines is most probable.
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Old 16th October 2018, 07:25 PM   #33
Jim McDougall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midelburgo
The third sword in the opening post is known in Mexico as a "Chinaco" sword. Chinacos were the revolutionary guerrillas against the Maximilian empire in the 1860s. Later they evolved with refined hilts including silver and gold inlaids and Toledo blades from the 1870s and 1880s as the weapons of Guerrilla commanders up to the times of Pancho Villa. You can see one of these with a discussion (in Spanish) here:
https://www.mexicoarmado.com/cuchill...la-hoja-2.html

The first sword, with the ring, has similar examples in Philipines, with hilts made of horn. One has to remember that under Spanish dominion, Philipines depended administratively from Mexico, and the main trade and contact route was through the Acapulco-Manila galleon. I am not sure if the prototypes originated on one side or the other, but I think Philipines is most probable.
Thank you Midelburgo, outstanding detail which I have not seen and valuable to add to our understanding of these Spanish and Mexican swords.
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