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Old 8th January 2022, 08:33 PM   #1
gp
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Default the making of a golok...

checkin'on TJIKEROEH, I noticed in Indonesia they refer to some types as "golok" and stumbled on some nice pieces of handcraft:

part I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hoFBMEAImE


part II

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opiFN0ZHDbA

grip / handle:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qhgnG4Dp9E

Last edited by gp; 9th January 2022 at 03:00 AM.
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Old 9th January 2022, 11:19 AM   #2
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Thanks for sharing! I was in Indonesia in 1997, Lombok to be precise. There I bought a new parang in a small traditional village. These are/were made there from old truck leaf springs.
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Old 14th January 2022, 01:31 AM   #3
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Thanks!
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Old 14th January 2022, 01:46 AM   #4
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I expect these fellows using hammers and teak charcoal could put to shame the Forged In Fire contestants even with all of the power equipment at their disposal.
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Old 14th January 2022, 11:14 AM   #5
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Nothing like hand tools to put you in touch with a job Rick.

This is a bit of a side bar Rick, but you might appreciate it.

Back in 1998 I bought a new Toyota Corolla, prior to that I'd had an old V8 Holden. Bit like a US Chevy.

So I figured I'd get a new garage built for it.

I hired a young builder, he was a carpenter, about 28-30, but he'd decided he could make more folding stuff if he was the boss rather than working for somebody else. All his tools were power tools. The offsider he had with him, builders labourer, about the same age, his tools were power tools too.

But along the way there were a few occasions when both these blokes needed to use a hand saw and an ordinary, old fashioned, 16ounce hammer.

You know, neither of these young construction workers could use a hand saw correctly --- they obviously thought you used all saws like they were hacksaws. Neither of them could hold a hammer correctly --- the results were predictable.

I held my tongue, but it was entertaining to watch.
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Old 14th January 2022, 12:18 PM   #6
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Similar to the ones here in the Philippines. I remember seeing several Indonesian sellers on FB groups for Filipino blades, seems that Sukabumi has a thriving blacksmithing industry.
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Old 14th January 2022, 12:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. G. Maisey View Post
Neither of them could hold a hammer correctly --- the results were predictable.
A close friend of 80 years, now retired, who worked for decades as a finish carpenter, has observed to me that up through his professional 'generation,' all of the tools in a Roman or Viking tool hoard would be clearly recognizable and understood to himself and colleagues, but, as you just observed, many have become 'alien' to modern young carpenters.
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Old 14th January 2022, 08:03 PM   #8
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I spent years swinging a 32oz Estwing framing hammer in my youth. I was glad at the workday's end when I could put it down and go to the pub.
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Old 15th January 2022, 02:02 AM   #9
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I started going onto building jobs with my dad when I was 8 years old, I continued all through my school years, and as much time as I could get off my real job until I was in my mid-twenties. I reckon I served about 4 or 5 apprenticeships as a fitout carpenter. Probably the most valuable experience I ever had because it convinced me I never, ever wanted to spend my life on tools.

Pens are much, much lighter.

But then in my thirties I started smithing as a hobby. Four pound hammers & eight pound hammers.

They reckon you gotta have brains to feel pain.
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