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Old 31st January 2021, 04:13 PM   #1
RSWORD
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Default Looking for translation assistance on large Indian sword

This is a very large Indian sword with a circular stamp near the handle. There appears to be a symbol in the stamp but I believe there may also be some numerals or other script around the symbol. Any information on the markings or possible translation if there are numerals or script is much appreciated.
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Old 31st January 2021, 05:59 PM   #2
Battara
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Looks like a form of trisula, very Hindu.
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Old 3rd February 2021, 03:16 PM   #3
Runjeet Singh
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I agree with Battara that it is a trisula (trident). The Trident stamp was used by quite a few Rajput states, and is often accompanied with the name of the Maharajah. Robert Elgood identifies several examples with trisula stamps in various formats and styles, but none of the readable and identifiable markings match the style and format of your marking Rick. The only one I could find in the Jodhpur catalogue that resembles yours (p.359), with the splayed trident, reads 'Shri Mataji' (revered goddess) under the trident. Your inscription is rubbed, and my devangari isn't proficient, but yours looks to say the same. The hilt type is also very similar. Robert dates the blade late 18th, and the hilt late 19th, early 20thC from Udaipur.
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Old 3rd February 2021, 04:20 PM   #4
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Beautiful blade and I wouldn't be very surprised if it were wootz.

Of course I would check it for wootz but Kubur would probably say I'm obsessed with it... (and he would probably be right ).
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Old 3rd February 2021, 10:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mariusgmioc
Beautiful blade and I wouldn't be very surprised if it were wootz.

Of course I would check it for wootz but Kubur would probably say I'm obsessed with it... (and he would probably be right ).
Well your case is a desperate case, Marius
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Old 7th February 2021, 03:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Runjeet Singh
I agree with Battara that it is a trisula (trident). The Trident stamp was used by quite a few Rajput states, and is often accompanied with the name of the Maharajah. Robert Elgood identifies several examples with trisula stamps in various formats and styles, but none of the readable and identifiable markings match the style and format of your marking Rick. The only one I could find in the Jodhpur catalogue that resembles yours (p.359), with the splayed trident, reads 'Shri Mataji' (revered goddess) under the trident. Your inscription is rubbed, and my devangari isn't proficient, but yours looks to say the same. The hilt type is also very similar. Robert dates the blade late 18th, and the hilt late 19th, early 20thC from Udaipur.
Thank you Runjeet for the information on the markings. Happy to hear that there is a similar stamp on an example in Elgoods book that also has a similar hilt.
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Old 8th February 2021, 02:25 AM   #7
shayde78
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Beyaautiful piece!
Is this sharpened on the inside edge? If so, is this a soussan pattah? If yes to both questions, do soussan pattah ever have more slender blades that are truly recurve (and bend back up after the initial downward sweep?
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Old 9th February 2021, 08:13 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shayde78
Beyaautiful piece!
Is this sharpened on the inside edge? If so, is this a soussan pattah? If yes to both questions, do soussan pattah ever have more slender blades that are truly recurve (and bend back up after the initial downward sweep?
Here is an example of a possible soussan pattah, but with the recurve feature I referenced above:
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Old 9th February 2021, 10:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shayde78
Beyaautiful piece!
Is this sharpened on the inside edge? If so, is this a soussan pattah? If yes to both questions, do soussan pattah ever have more slender blades that are truly recurve (and bend back up after the initial downward sweep?
Thank you. No, the picture orientation makes it look like a sossun pattah but that is actually the spine side. You can see on the opposite side, at the forte, a slight Indian ricasso. The blade is more saber or kilij shaped. My apologies for the poor image.
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