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Old 15th February 2021, 04:23 PM   #1
M ELEY
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Default Old flintlock conversion to percussion

Here is a pistol that started me into collecting over 30 years ago. I received it from a great uncle and I must confess that I didn't pay it too much attention as I assumed it was a target pistol and late 19th c. percussion. The other day, I took it down from the mantle and really looked at it and realized that it might be (???) an old flintlock with later conversion to percussion? Again, for give as I am more an edged weapon collector.
The mechanism on the piece is crisp and works well. I tried to capture the detailing on the piece. Although a worn example, one can still make out traces of gold inlay, a scene on the top of the barrel of a stag, foliage work on the butt-cape, beautiful wood scrolling/patterning to the wood. It has it's original ramrod and a small repair with nail (unfortunately cracked). The interesting thing about it is that the gun is very light despite not being a small weapon by any means.
My questions are- Am I right that it is a conversion piece? How old might the original pistol be? Country of origin? Dueling pistol? Target? Would it be worth my while (with this piece's rugged condition) to try and restore a flintlock to the piece and what might be involved? I don't care about the value. really, but I also wanted to know if the value is greatly affected by the percussion conversion? I'm assuming so-
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Old 15th February 2021, 04:31 PM   #2
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Default More pics...

Some more pics of the pistol-
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Old 15th February 2021, 06:25 PM   #3
fernando
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If it is a conversion work, is very well 'disguised', Mark.
Trying to get it back to flint is an option; which i wouldn' adopt myself.
It is admitable that a gun converted to percussion would not keep its original value but ... what the hell; it has an history, all the same.
I like the shadow of your elegant hands while taking the first picture .
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Old 15th February 2021, 07:03 PM   #4
M ELEY
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[QUOTE=fernando]If it is a conversion work, is very well 'disguised', Mark.
Trying to get it back to flint is an option; which i wouldn' adopt myself.
It is admitable that a gun converted to percussion would not keep its original value but ... what the hell; it has an history, all the same.
I like the shadow of your elegant hands while taking the first picture .

Well, you know I am a 'hand model', Fernando-
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Old 15th February 2021, 08:13 PM   #5
Fernando K
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Hello

First of all, restoring this piece to flint implies having a cock (hammer) model and we don't know what it was like. Of course it is a careful conversion, the places where the frizzen spring was have kept their original design. I do not see the threaded holes of the screw of the frizzen and its spring, properly plugged, but it is a test of careful work. The presence of gold is not incrustation, but gilding on fire (an impossible practice today, due to its toxicity). It is not a dueling pistol, due to the profuse decoration. The English dueling weapons had little decoration and the French pairs were much later. For decoration, I lean towards France, sometime in the 18th century.

I would leave it like this, restoring the wooden box and cleaning. You can never go back to the original state.

Affectionately
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Old 15th February 2021, 10:35 PM   #6
adrian
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I agree with all Fernando K's comments and I would also go further re the original configuration of this pistol to state that I think it has not been converted from flint. I see no sign of the holes that would have been filled on the face, and perhaps inspecting the rear of the lock, as well as the nipple lump attachment etc would determine this for certain. May I suggest that you look closely at the face for evidence, such as seen in the photo below that I have extracted from a book.
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