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Old 1st August 2021, 04:02 PM   #1
kronckew
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Default Bush Knife?

Just acquired this. Looks too classy for a repurposed chef's knife — I remember James Bowie carried something similar onto the sandbar and defeated soundly a gang of n'er-do-wells.


It appears to be an African bush knife, heavy 16 in. single edged blade, 2 in wide ^ 1/8" thick just before the integral bolster, slight distal taper to point. Full tang, wood grips wound in rattan to improve grip. Nice scabbard, looks like goat skin. Logo on blade looks like <something> BROS LTD under a snake tail, left end illegible.


Does anyone recognize the Logo? Or the style of the scabbard? (The other (right) side of the scabbard looks exactly the same, minus the belt loop, and the central line of stitching is a bit wavy and the terminal knots for the decorative banding are on that side. Looks like it was made for wear inside the belt. Blade fits nicely either left or right.


Any Info appreciated, thanks.
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Old 1st August 2021, 04:31 PM   #2
Tim Simmons
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S. & J. KITCHIN
Sheffield
Manufacturers of any classes of table cutlery and electroplate. Founded in 1853 by Samuel Kitchin (1821-1866). After his death, restyled S.& J. Kitchin by his brother John Kitchin (1839-1894). After the death of John Kitchin (1894) the property was maintained under the control of Kitchin family. They were the owners of G.A. Close Youle & Co Ltd (acquired in 1924), Snake Brand Products Ltd and various trademarks including "FAME ", "DURATION " and "SUPERLATIVE. In 1960, Kitchin abandoned cutlery manufacture.

As they were brothers it is quite possible that S & J Bros LTD was used on some products under the registered snake trade mark.
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Old 1st August 2021, 05:25 PM   #3
Ren Ren
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In my opinion, the scabbard is in Brazilian style.
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Old 1st August 2021, 06:23 PM   #4
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Thanks, y'all. It came with a fairly decent African short sword/dagger.
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Old 3rd August 2021, 03:54 PM   #5
colin henshaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kronckew View Post
Or the style of the scabbard? (The other (right) side of the scabbard looks exactly the same, minus the belt loop, and the central line of stitching is a bit wavy and the terminal knots for the decorative banding are on that side. Looks like it was made for wear inside the belt.


Any Info appreciated, thanks.
The belt loop looks a bit similar to the one on the sheath for this knife, that I posted a little while ago, and is from Cameroon...
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Old 3rd August 2021, 03:59 PM   #6
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Oops forgot photo.
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Old 3rd August 2021, 04:22 PM   #7
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Thanks, Colin.


Quite similar. I forgot to mention my 'flap is secured top as a flap, and by AND bottom by being sewed in two places, so the only way to secure the scabbard is by threading a belt thru. My Brazilian/So. American knives with bovine leather sheaths do indeed have a flap. Integral or sewn only at the top, to allow it being tucked into a sash from the top. The flap is keeping it from falling further down, and allowing the sheath to also be pulled up & out without undoing the sash or belt.



Mine is also made of goatskin, which i've not seen in the Americas, north or south, but, like lizard (croc) is common in Africa (and Brazil).


Yours, like mine seems to be a common repurposing of european large cutlery as bush knives rather than purpose built machetes. In the thread of yours, there are other large knives, with similarly decorative and functional thong/cord bindings and bands.
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