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-   -   Marsh Arab dagger. Request for translation. (http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showthread.php?t=26854)

Saracen 2nd April 2021 05:24 PM

Marsh Arab dagger. Request for translation.
 
3 Attachment(s)
Good day everyone.
This is not a very old dagger, I think not older than the middle of the last century, but it is made neatly and traditionally for this type.
It has an inscription on the back of the scabbard.
Is it possible to translate it?
I would be very grateful for that.

kwiatek 2nd April 2021 08:03 PM

“General Cunningham”

:-)

Ren Ren 2nd April 2021 11:02 PM

An amazing twist in history! :)

Saracen 3rd April 2021 07:28 PM

Kwiatek, thank you very much.

Saracen 3rd April 2021 07:29 PM

I think Cunningham could have received this dagger as a gift while in Palestine from 1945 to 1948 as High Commissioner for Palestine and Transjordan.

Or did he buy and sign his favorite dagger himself so as not to lose it? :)

Probably the second, judging by the abundance of smiles :)

gp 3rd April 2021 07:47 PM

so what kind of dagger is it as the Marsh Arabs are quite some distance away from Palestine ( as far as London or Paris are from Berlin...or Marsh Arabs from Yemen) so I expect the cold arms also differ from those of their fellow Arabs?
Or am I mistaken...? ( mafish haga / I don't know... ;) :shrug: )

Saracen 4th April 2021 12:58 AM

Jordan is closer. Almost like Hanover from Berlin :)
In this position, Cunningham was supposed to have many diplomatic contacts with neighboring countries.
Dagger could be presented with such a contact as a distinctive, a original Iraqi dagger without a direct connection with his area of ​​existence.
I also don’t know if I’m mistaken :)
In any case, even without this inscription, I like it as a well-made ethnic item.

Drabant1701 4th April 2021 10:31 AM

I like the dagger even without the inscription, well made and in great condition.
The inscription just makes it really special. Congratulations!

gp 4th April 2021 07:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saracen
In any case, even without this inscription, I like it as a well-made ethnic item.

Yes, it is indeed a very nice item, which I also do like very much as well.
Especially the handle / grip.

My question was with the intention to learn more about the cold weapons from that region as I do lack that knowledge.

So can some one tell me fare these kind of knives typical from that region or limited to a certain erea?

ariel 4th April 2021 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gp

The inscription I think is a pity as except for the historical context (occupier or colonizer conform the Sykes-Picot agreement) and giving added value from a sales point of view, the man clearly didn't belong there/ should never have been there in the first place. Nevertheless a very beautiful knife indeed!

We are discussing the weapon, not the political issues of the past.

gp 4th April 2021 09:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ariel
We are discussing the weapon, not the political issues of the past.

Ok and thank you: I shall refrain from this kind of comments if it disturbs.

But can you please answer my question as we are dicussing weapons:
are these kind of knives typical from that region or limited to a certain erea?

Battara 5th April 2021 12:29 AM

Thanks guys! :D

Ian 5th April 2021 07:31 AM

In response to gp's question, I'm no authority on these daggers but it has been my understanding that these daggers are the form of jambiya used in southern Iraq, and that the style (particularly the hilt and pommel) is fairly specific to that area.


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