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Old 8th January 2021, 04:10 PM   #1
Sajen
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Default A big and very old pira for discussion

I was able to add a pira to the collection, it's a rather big sword with 79 cm overall and a blade from 50,5 cm, behind the handle is the blade 9,5 mm thick.
I think to see two blade repairs, see the pictures. The blade is rather pitted, sadly. Ferrule is from pinkish silver. The tip of the blade is thickened at the tip again, is this a common feature by pira blades?
Like usual, all comments are welcome!
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Old 8th January 2021, 04:31 PM   #2
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Cool

This thickening that you speak of Detlef is not present in the blade of my example which is almost identical to yours but a bit shorter at 27 inches overall.

Nice find; we don't see many of this form.
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Old 8th January 2021, 04:44 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
This thickening that you speak of Detlef is not present in the blade of my example which is almost identical to yours but a bit shorter at 27 inches overall.

Nice find; we don't see many of this form.


Thank you Rick! The thickening at the blades tip is one of the reasons to let me think that the blade is very old, it would be great to know how it is by other examples.
That we don't see many of them is the reason that they are so expensive! This are rare swords, we can be happy to own such a sword!

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 8th January 2021, 06:06 PM   #4
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Hi Detlef, I think we have similar pieces. Mine has a blade length of 51.5cm, and 78cm overall. The tip is also thickened at the tip. Spine thickness at the base is 0.8cm. I'm not sure what the ferrule material is, but it has engravings. Posting a pic comparing it with a younger pira.
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Old 8th January 2021, 06:56 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xasterix
Hi Detlef, I think we have similar pieces. Mine has a blade length of 51.5cm, and 78cm overall. The tip is also thickened at the tip. Spine thickness at the base is 0.8cm. I'm not sure what the ferrule material is, but it has engravings. Posting a pic comparing it with a younger pira.


Hi Xas, yes, they are indeed very similar, from measurements and from the appearance also. The thickened tip gives the blade an extra strengthening where it's needed. Nice blade condition, I am a little bit jealous!

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 8th January 2021, 07:36 PM   #6
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Hello Detlef,

Congrats, that certainly is a nice example! I'd be very interested to see how this blade looks after etching (that will also help to analyze those 2 areas that you think may be repairs). I don't think the pitting distracts very much - it's certainly a good blade!

I have a really similar piece (with suasa ferrule) that is also thinner where the blade is wider and again thicker where narrowing towards the tip. I believe this is mainly due to forging a billet of relatively even thickness to different widths, something that can be seen with many SEA blades. I'm not convinced the thinness of the wide part has any important functional reason; one possibility would be to increase cutting ability near the sweet spot.

We certainly need more details from a wide variety of this traditional gasah/pira style. Since dating is difficult to begin with, establishing a reliable timeline might prove very tough.

Could you add more dimensions for your blade, please? Will also try this weekend.

Regards,
Kai

Last edited by kai : 9th January 2021 at 04:06 PM.
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Old 8th January 2021, 08:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
Congrats, that certainly is a nice example! I'd be very interested to see how this blade looks after etching (that will also help to analyze those 2 areas that you think may be repairs). I don't think the pitting distracts very much - it's certainly a good blade!


Hello Kai,
Thank you! I'll work a little bit more at the blade before I try an etch. Will post some pics where the two areas are better visible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
I have a really similar piece (with suasa ferrule) that is also thinner where the blade is wider and again thicker where narrowing towards the tip. I believe this is mainly due to forging a billet of relatively even thickness to different widths, something that can be seen with many SEA blades. I'm not convinced the thinness of the wide part has an important functional reason; one possibility would be to increase cutting ability near the sweet spot.


I think that the thickened tip area gives the blade some more weight to the tip and strengthening to a possible weak area. Just my guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
We certainly need more details from a wide variety of this traditional gasah/pira style. Since dating is difficult to begin with, establishing a reliable timeline might prove very tough.


Indeed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
Could you add more dimensions for your blade, please? Will also try this weekend.


Will try it tomorrow!

Regards,
Detlef
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Old 9th January 2021, 07:21 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kai
Hello Detlef,

... I'm not convinced the thinness of the wide part has an important functional reason; one possibility would be to increase cutting ability near the sweet spot.

...


I concurr, it's just adding weight to the tip to increase the cutting impact of the working area, much like the adding of a 'yelman' to the newer model shown in the thread.
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