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Old 12th September 2020, 07:32 AM   #1
tanaruz
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Default BAGOBO DATU CLASS

Hi friends,

A Bagobo kampilan datu class.

Regards

Yves

Note: with a t'nalak abaca weave cloth (scabbard)
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Old 12th September 2020, 08:43 AM   #2
Ian
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Hi Yves. Nice example.
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Old 12th September 2020, 11:32 AM   #3
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Wink BAGOBO DATU CLASS

Hi Sir Ian,

Many thanks!

Yves
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Old 12th September 2020, 01:54 PM   #4
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Default Bagobo

Hello,

Very nice example.

Just to clarify, Ďtínalakí is very specific to the Tboli. Bagobo weaving is generally known as Ďinabalí. Both utilize abaca and the ikat method and while there are many similarities, they are unique styles. Therefor we should say that the textile on your scabbard is inabal.
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Old 12th September 2020, 03:29 PM   #5
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Question

I know Iím not the sharpest knife in the drawer; but how is this classified as a kampilan? This begs the question: how is a kampilan defined these days? Is it now just a term for a large Philippine sword?
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Old 12th September 2020, 11:19 PM   #6
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I would agree Rick that this is not a kampilan nor a datu class piece.

Datu glass pieces usually distinguish themselves by having lots of bead work on the scabbard.

Here is my example for comparison:
http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showt...ght=datu+bagobo
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Old 12th September 2020, 11:22 PM   #7
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Your example is nice. Hard to find these complete. The only thing is that your's is missing the other silver bands on the scabbard.

Still a nice example and thank you for posting it.
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Old 13th September 2020, 02:29 AM   #8
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I am a bit confused: is it a split pommel or a split chape of the scabbard? Reminds me of a pakayun.
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Old 13th September 2020, 02:58 AM   #9
Ian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
I know Iím not the sharpest knife in the drawer; but how is this classified as a kampilan? This begs the question: how is a kampilan defined these days? Is it now just a term for a large Philippine sword?
Rick,

You are correct. This is not a kampilan-like blade. I don't know what this blade profile is called by the Bagobo, but we should not give it an incorrect name here. AFAIK, the kampilan is still defined by the traditional Moro blade. Similar blade styles among the Lumad tribes have different names. The T'boli call their traditional kampilan-like sword a tok. [This should not be confused with the general name for a sword in T'boli, which is kafilan--and awfully close to kampilan so as to be confusing).

I will try to search out Bagobo names for their swords, or maybe one of our members can tell us.
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Old 13th September 2020, 03:00 AM   #10
Ian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ariel
I am a bit confused: is it a split pommel or a split chape of the scabbard? Reminds me of a pakayun.
Hi ariel,

It's a split chape you are seeing. And yes, I also think it looks like a Pakayun hilt. The pattern of tying the two sides of the fork and bridging the space is similar.
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Old 13th September 2020, 03:06 AM   #11
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Hello Ariel,

The wooden tip of this Bagobo scabbard has 2 decorated metal tidbits attached while the 2-pronged pommel of a pakayun/parapat/pelepet is carved from a single piece of wood. I don't think there is any historic relationship...

Regards,
Kai
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Old 13th September 2020, 03:08 AM   #12
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Jose,

I think what Yves was referring to as "datu class" was the style of hilt. Some would say that this style is reserved for swords of distinction, while more ordinary swords have a simpler style such as shown on this sword, which also has an ikat wrap. Perhaps Marbel could tell us if the textile is T'boli or Bagabo in origin.

Ian

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Old 13th September 2020, 03:19 AM   #13
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Default Textile

Hi Ian,

Itís always a bit hard to identify a textile when itís only a small piece, but the scabbard youíve shown appears to be wrapped in Tboli tínalak.
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Old 13th September 2020, 03:23 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbel
Hi Ian,

Itís always a bit hard to identify a textile when itís only a small piece, but the scabbard youíve shown appears to be wrapped in Tboli tínalak.
Thanks Craig. I thought it was probably T'boli, but I am far from an expert like yourself on the T'boli and Bagobo textiles.
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Old 13th September 2020, 04:17 AM   #15
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Default Textile

Hi Ian,

I feel like quite a few of these lumad scabbards (like the one you showed, not the nice old Bagobo and sometimes Blaan/Tagakaolo examples with great Ďmoundsí of textiles and sometimes beads wrapped at the tops of the scabbard) had textiles added to them later on in their lives. Maybe they were added to make them appear more interesting or indigenous. As you know, the old wooden Tboli and Blaan scabbards can often be beautifully carved. I suppose itís a bit blasphemous on some level (maybe not), but Iím often tempted to cut the textile off what appears to likely be an old scabbard just to see whatís underneath.
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