Ethnographic Arms & Armour
 

Go Back   Ethnographic Arms & Armour > Discussion Forums > Ethnographic Weapons
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 16th July 2014, 04:48 AM   #1
Iliad
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 187
Default Indian Parrying Shield

Greetings all,

Here are a few pics of a recent purchase. I hope that it will be of interest and at least can go into the archives.
Best regards
Brian
Attached Images
      
Iliad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2014, 05:49 AM   #2
VANDOO
(deceased)
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: OKLAHOMA, USA
Posts: 3,140
Thumbs up

NICE ONE AND IT SHOWS A GOOD HIT ON ONE OF THE BOSSES PERHAPS A LIFE SAVING BLOCK. I ESPECIALLY LIKE THE SMALL BELLS, THEY COULD GIVE A KIND OF WARNING (LEAVE ME ALONE!) LIKE THE RATTLESNAKE BEFORE A STRIKE.
VANDOO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2014, 03:47 PM   #3
weapons 27
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 449
Default

Nice piece

too bad that a bump is pressed !!!
weapons 27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2014, 09:53 PM   #4
Montino Bourbon
Member
 
Montino Bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Posts: 265
Default For wading into a crowd

This weapon, a Madu, was used to rescue someone in the middle of a melče.
Montino Bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th July 2014, 11:44 PM   #5
Battara
EAAF Staff
 
Battara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 6,594
Default

Am I correct that this was used mostly by sadu holy men?
Battara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th July 2014, 03:12 AM   #6
Jim McDougall
Arms Historian
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 7,895
Default

This is an outstanding example of one of these, as far as I have known, reasonably rarely seen weapons. It appears to have some age, and seems certainly of 19th century but how far back hard to say without handling it.
These 'parrying shields' are discussed in most references but only briefly (Stone, Burton, Paul, Robinson, Egerton, Elgood, Pant), and are referred to as Madu; Maru or Singhauta.

These fall into the class of Indian arms associated with Hindu mendicants (sometimes termed faqirs but that is a Muslim term), who were technically prohibited from carrying arms. These paired horn weapons were apparently a Dravidian form adopted by the Bhil tribes of the Deccan.
In later times the Bhil tribes, who were Hindu, were employed by the ruling Rajputs and in many cases were trained by Rajput warriors as they sought to help protect their homeland.

By the 16th century an army of Hindu Sadhus, warrior ascetics known as Nanga Sanyasis was formed by Madhusadana Saraswati of Bengal, and again trained by the Rajput armies to stop massacres and action which was apparently waged against them by Muslims, particularly in the Benares regions.

In searching through examples of dhal (shields) as well as these madu, I wanted to find the distinctive crescent moon motif. While it seems I have seen these in many cases the one example I found was a madu in Egerton (#693) stated with antelope horns , a 9" shield, with the four bosses and the crescent moon.
This example was shown as from Benares.
Other similar examples were from Punjab and Delhi.

It would seem that the crescent, significant to Hindu's as a symbol of Shiva, also is known significant as symbolic to the Chandravanishi Rajputs (Chandra =moon) (E Paul, 2005, p121).
With the representation of the moon having these associations, and the information on these warrior ascetics from Benares, it would seem plausible, pending further research, to tentatively presume this may be a madu from Benares and associated with these groups.

Interesting suggestion on the bells, and in certain Oriental and Asian contexts bells are attached to weapons (I believe they are tiger bells? in China). I am inclined to think in this case these may be intended for processional use, much in the way jingles are used in temple ceremonies to ward off evil spirits etc.

Absolutely fascinating piece Brian!!! and thank you for sharing it here.
While my research on these Hindu warrior ascetics was fascinating, I must admit little true understanding on the particulars. I hope those more familiar might offer corrections as required and I beg their indulgence.

All the best,
Jim
Jim McDougall is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 17th July 2014, 02:26 PM   #7
Ian
Vikingsword Staff
 
Ian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: The Aussie Bush
Posts: 3,039
Default

Great post Jim.

The bells on this piece also look like "hawk bells" that were used in falconry and are found too on Native American pieces.

Very interesting weapon and a nice example.

Ian
Ian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th July 2014, 03:29 PM   #8
Jim McDougall
Arms Historian
 
Jim McDougall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Route 66
Posts: 7,895
Default

Hi Ian,
Thank you so much for the kind words, and I have been remiss in not welcoming you back sooner......it great to have you here again!!! Its been a long time my friend.
I also thank you for the note on these bells, an interesting feature clearly found in weapons and material culture in many ethnographic contexts.

These interesting parrying weapons, in similar manner, have diffused into many cultures and influenced other weapon forms such as the 'haladie' which is the dual bladed dagger of course from India, Middle East and Sudan among other versions.

I must add that the connection I found in looking further into this madu weapon form was far more esoteric than I had expected, and hopefully will add perspective to the cursory material found in the usual references.
As always I do look forward to entries with additional information or examples.

All the very best,
Jim
Jim McDougall is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 01:53 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Posts are regarded as being copyrighted by their authors and the act of posting material is deemed to be a granting of an irrevocable nonexclusive license for display here.