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Old 15th September 2020, 05:08 PM   #1
corrado26
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Default Stilettos

Just to show you a bundle of stilettos, may be you like them.
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Old 15th September 2020, 05:21 PM   #2
Jim McDougall
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Udo, now thats what I call a beautiful 'floral' arrangement!
Stilettos are a fascinating dagger, and there are of course many ideas about how they were in use, and what period etc.
Most interesting are the 'bombardier or gunner' versions which had the often mysterious calibrations graduated on the blade. It seems some of these had curious figures which were said to to represent certain measures used in the 'art' of gunnery.

There is of course the theory that the narrow blade was the perfect size to 'spike' the touch hole of cannon in case of a battery being overrun. It seems a shame that such a beautiful dagger would be deliberately sacrificed for this mundane purpose, better to have a plain spike handy.....but then nobody 'planned' to be overrun.

Anything specific on the examples in this 'arrangement'.?
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Old 15th September 2020, 05:54 PM   #3
fernando
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Udo, i will have all four flowers; you can keep the vase .
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Old 16th September 2020, 07:29 AM   #4
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Oh, I forgot one and so I made a further photo. The longest one has a thumb ring and a four edged blade, its hilt is made of wood or horn
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Old 17th September 2020, 04:53 PM   #5
fernando
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Are all these beauties yours, Udo ?
Does any of them have the 'centoventi' (grade) marks on their blades ?
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Old 17th September 2020, 05:24 PM   #6
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Yes they are all mine but none has a scale on its blade.
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Old 17th September 2020, 05:28 PM   #7
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Still they are a precious treasure, Udo... no doubt. Thanks much for sharing .
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Old 27th September 2020, 01:18 PM   #8
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Default Stiletto s

You have an eye for quality. Please hit me up if you ever have any for sale.
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Old 28th September 2020, 02:27 AM   #9
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The stiletto evolved around end of the 16th c. and was most popular in the 17th c. These were truly examples of the artistry of steel chiseling and while it is often suggested these were used to spike threatened guns, it seems a shame to use these in that manner.

When these were used in Venice as gunners daggers (as previously discussed, in mid 17th c. (see "Gunners Daggers" Marcello Ferenzi, 'Arms & Armor Annual, 1973, pp.170-79). ...the mysterious calibrations degenerated into often spurious gauges to legitimize the possession of what were dangerous assassins weapons.
In those times only artillery gunners were allowed to have these 'fusetti'.
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Old 28th September 2020, 11:14 AM   #10
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I guess the presumed purpose to spike guns while retreating was also a way to bleach their carrying around. As i also believe that these splendid Udo's examples have necessarily belonged to whealthy or high rank owners, who didn't need to justity their possession.
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Old 28th September 2020, 05:40 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
... i also believe that these splendid Udo's examples have necessarily belonged to wealthy or high rank owners, who didn't need to justify their possession.


Bit like the germanic rules that only the Nobility could carry swords, the common muck were only allowed to carry knives. resulting in some rather long messer.
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