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Old 9th September 2020, 03:58 PM   #1
Lansquenet59
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Default Strange sword

Hello everyone,

Does anyone have any idea about this kind of sword? (Sorry I only have these 2 photos) I know, it's hard to give an opinion. But if that can make you think of something already seen.

Thank you !
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Old 9th September 2020, 04:17 PM   #2
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I have improved your foto a little bit
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Old 9th September 2020, 10:23 PM   #3
Jim McDougall
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It is truly a stretch to try to make out much on this sword from these photos, as noted and agreed. However what I might suggest is perhaps some sort of training or fencing epee. The tall olive type pommel is characteristic of mid to latter 18th century styles on various swords typically of military character in that time.

The thin blade is impossible to see, but looks 'blockish' almost as if squared in section.
While these are of course not 'combat' weapons, they, along with early fencing weapons, are fascinating in their own right, especially early forms like this.

Photo is a British light dragoon sword c. 1750s showing the pommel type which seems simiilar.
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Old 10th September 2020, 07:27 AM   #4
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Early 18th century foil it seems : https://ahfi.org/weapon-description...-floretfleuret/ Do you have more pictures ?
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Old 10th September 2020, 09:04 AM   #5
fernando
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Very good shot; right on target, Yvain .
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Old 10th September 2020, 09:33 AM   #6
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Thanks Fernando ! Even late 17th century it seems. (Picture cropped and taken from "Les Vrays principes de l'espée seule", Philibert de La Touche, 1670.)
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Old 10th September 2020, 11:39 AM   #7
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It is absolutely! Thank you so much. A mystery solved.
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Old 10th September 2020, 11:46 AM   #8
fernando
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Red face May i digress a little ?

Excelent picture Yvain; and a work worth to be saved to one's files.
We can clearly see that the crown guard in this "florete" is the same as in photos posted by Thomas. No doubt a very early example.
While in this (French) case, swords of this typology were exclusively created for the school fencing, in the Iberian Peninsula swords could be similar to actual weapons, but with their blades originaly blunt and their points wrapped in a (stuffed) leather button, the so called 'sapatilha', the name also given to ballet shoes, due to their reinforced toes.
These training swords were called 'espadas pretas' (black swords), for their blades not being sharpend, their colour remained (forge) dark.
For those not so strict in following established rules, real swords could show up in the salon, their edges blunted and the tip 'folded' for the purpose.
Further atempts to modify the training into an actual fight (not so rare to occur), the salon master was there with his staff to punish the offender.


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Last edited by fernando : 11th September 2020 at 05:53 PM.
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Old 10th September 2020, 03:37 PM   #9
Jim McDougall
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I think it might be an 18th c. foil .
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Old 11th September 2020, 06:42 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDougall
I think it might be an 18th c. foil .

I don't know, Jm. It could be older ... and rare !

.
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Old 17th September 2020, 02:50 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
I don't know, Jm. It could be older ... and rare !

.



Wow! good catch! thats a lot older than I thought, and had not seen these early foils.
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Old 19th September 2020, 11:42 AM   #12
Ian
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Perhaps this edit helps.
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